Homeowner
Resource Center

Homeowner
Resource Center

Homeowner
Resource Center

Homeowner
Resource Center

Model and serial numbers can be found on your original warranty or sales invoice. If you do not have access to these documents, this information can be found on the unit itself. Please browse the product types below for specific details on locating a model or serial number:

Tank-Type

The label containing model and serial number information can be found on the front of a tank-type water heater.

Tankless

The label containing model and serial number information can be found on the front or on the right hand side of a tankless water heater depending on the model.

Model and serial numbers can be found on your original warranty or sales invoice. If you do not have access to these documents, this information can be found on the unit itself. Please browse the product types below for specific details on locating a model or serial number:

Split-Systems

The label containing model and serial number information can be found on the back of the outdoor unit and on the inside front cover of the indoor unit. Two model and serial tags identify split system equipment.

Package-Systems

One model and serial number tag is used to identify Package System equipment. The tag is located on the outside corner of the unit. One model and serial tag identifies package equipment.

Sizing Water Heaters

Sizing is the technique that matches the capacity of the hot water source to your needs. For tank water heaters, the key criterion is hot water storage capacity. For tankless water heaters, the key criterion is hot water flow rate. Incoming water temperature is a critical consideration, which varies by region and season. That is, a water heater in the North—either tank or tankless—will need a higher BTU input in the winter than the summer to heat and deliver water to a given temperature.
Regardless of which type of water heater is used, you should start with a lifestyle audit of your typical usage:

Hot Water Usage Audit Questionnaire

  1. Baths: How many bathrooms are in the house?
  2. Showers: How many showers are in the house and how many showerheads, body sprays and side sprays are in each shower? How much water do they use? Standard showerheads have a flow rate of 2.5 gallons per minute, although new water-efficient showerheads have lower flow rates. Most people are comfortable showering in water temperatures around 102°F to 106°F.
  3. Bathtubs: How many bathtubs and whirlpools are in the house? How many gallons are needed to fill each to capacity? While small tubs are usually about 40 gallons, deep soaking tubs can hold up to 140 gallons. As with showering, remember, most people bathe at temperatures between 102°F to 106°F.
  4. Schedules: What is the typical bathing and bathroom use schedule in the home? How many occupants are likely to be bathing simultaneously?
  5. Other hot water appliances: Are any other hot water appliances in use at the same time? If so, these need to be calculated also, e.g., dishwasher, hot-water laundry, kitchen use, etc.
  6. Geography: Where is your home? Consider the winter inlet water temperatures in the area to make sure there’s sufficient hot water flow on the coldest days. The rule of thumb is:
    1. 40°F for the northern tier of states.
    2. 50°F in most parts of the South.
    3. 60°F year-round in Southern California, the Southwest and Gulf states.
  7. Do the math; select the right unit: Add up your peak demand in gallons per minute and see which size of tank water heater will satisfy this peak requirement at the very coldest time of the year; i.e., when the difference between the inlet and outlet water temperatures will range as high as 75°F if you live in the Northeast or Upper Midwest. For example, if a Minneapolis homeowner picks a system that will handle a Delta T of 75°F in the winter (45°F inlet to 120°F outlet) to meet the needs of a household that runs two showers simultaneously every weekday morning, this consumer need not worry about the summer, when the inlet temp should be 20°F to 25°F warmer.

While tankless water heaters do not run out of hot water, if not sized correctly, the flow rate of that water can be adversely impacted. The temperature of the shower will remain the same, but flow could slow to a trickle. So the first step in sizing tankless water heaters is to add up all the flow rates of showerheads, faucets and appliances that are likely to be in use at the same time. Step two is to consider the incoming water temperature. When inlet water temperatures dip down into the 30s and 40s, larger BTU inputs will be needed. In certain high-volume applications, you may want to specify more than one tankless water heater unit, either installed separately or connected together to operate as a single tankless system.
The Rheem EZ-Link technology will facilitate this application.

Need to size a tankless solution for commercial application? Our EZ-Spec Online Sizing Tool makes it easy.

Rheem Product Education

Let us teach you everything you need to know to make informed decisions about your heating, cooling and water heating equipment.

Rebate Center

We’ll find savings for you based on your location

Have Questions?

Get answers with a little help from our FAQs page

Customer Service

For general contact information visit the contact page

Need More Help?

The best help you can get—whether you’re looking for service or looking to buy—is from an independent Rheem Pro